A Summary and Analysis of ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs’ — Interesting Literature

The meaning of a classic fairy tale Blood wishes, talking mirrors, and poisoned fruit: it’s all here in ‘Snow White’, one of the most enduringly popular and recognisable fairy tales in western literature. Yet what is the story of Snow White and the seven dwarfs really about? Does it have a moral? And what are […]

via A Summary and Analysis of ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs’ — Interesting Literature

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Dante Among the Machines: Margaret Oliphant’s ‘The Land of Darkness’ — Interesting Literature

In this week’s Dispatches from the Secret Library, Dr Oliver Tearle considers a curious dystopian story by Queen Victoria’s favourite novelist The terms ‘dystopian’ and ‘ecology’ both gained currency in the mid-nineteenth century, although ‘dystopia’ has been traced back even earlier. The Victorian era witnessed the emergence of a new genre of science fiction, dystopian literature, […]

via Dante Among the Machines: Margaret Oliphant’s ‘The Land of Darkness’ — Interesting Literature

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark

This is one of those books one can read and think, “Ah, the scandal”.

A renegade teacher.  A possible not so secret lover.  Betrayal by a student.  What could be better?

The more I’ve worked in education, the more I can appreciate this work.  Jean Brodie has no children of her own, so she cultivates her own group from the students at a small private school where she teaches.  Jean Brodie makes the reader cringe and that is a good thing.  Some people may think she is evil and just plain blind to the world around her.  It depends on the perspective.

Why is this point really her prime, if it is her prime at all?  Perhaps Miss Brodie knows it is now or never to cultivate her legacy.

This book could never happen today.  This is a great, well-written, compact story and a classic.  Don’t cheat by watching the movie.

Daily Prompt: Cringe

via Daily Prompt: Cringe

I spent over three hours and ended up with three large bags full of poison ivy.  Poison ivy makes me cringe.

Cringe is a normal reaction.  We can cringe at a lot of things and everyone is different at what they cringe at.  Some things we are afraid of others are not.  No one person is the same.

Also, how we cringe is different.  Some people are very physical and some people it can only be a twitch.  Others don’t show any physical sign.

What makes you cringe?  How do you cringe?  What do you notice when people around you cringe?

Photo Challenge: Transient

via Photo Challenge: Transient

I don’t have a photo I’ve taken for this word.  Someday.  Yet for right now the word can be discussed.

Transient population.  This expression always pops into mind.

Yet what does it mean to be transient?

This is a word that is related to transport, transportation, transfigure, transpose to go across something.  The suffix trans- and moving of some sort.

Does owning a home mean one is not transient?  Staying in one place for a long while?

What about nature?  Most animals are transient, constantly on the move.  For them being transient is a good thing, usually, and they are listening to what their body, more specifically something in their neurological and reproductive system, is telling them to do.

Are we humans meant to be transient?  Our ancestors were.  Yet being classified as a “transient” today is a negative thing.  Is that because one may not be part of a community for a long while?

Thoughts?

Ford Madox Ford’s ‘Antwerp’: The First Great Modernist Poem of WWI — Interesting Literature

In this week’s Dispatches from the Secret Library, Dr Oliver Tearle explores a modernist war poem by an overlooked writer As it’s Refugee Week, my thoughts have turned to poetry about refugees – such as Auden’s ‘Refugee Blues’ and the lines from the Elizabethan play Sir Thomas More (which may have been penned by Shakespeare) […]

via Ford Madox Ford’s ‘Antwerp’: The First Great Modernist Poem of WWI — Interesting Literature