Daily Prompt: Sail

via Daily Prompt: Sail

This word is a summer word.

Teaching English, English uses this verb to describe what a boat does.  Other uses include a balloon sailing up in the air, or a bird sailing on the wind.  Are wind surfers sailing or surfing or both?

Enya uses this in one of her songs.  She describes sailing away.

In English you can sail in, sail into, sail on, sail up, sail down, sail toward, sail away…..basically any type of direction you need to go.

Years ago I took a basic boating class and the instructor always complained about local birds pooping on the sails.  The physical sails are tough and strong but too much bird poop is a bad thing.

Hoist your sails and live your life.

Advertisements

Vice Away

Spoiler: Without some kind of vice……..

The hardest part about English is that one word may have several different meanings in different parts of speech.  I was working with clients today and going over prepositions (are you falling asleep yet?) and they asked about the word “away”.  Away is not a preposition.  It is mainly an adverb but can also be a noun.

Okay, on to the word “vice”.

In English we have Vice President, viceroy, vice.  Vice comes from Latin and is one of those words that didn’t change over between the languages.

Viceroy is a ruler.

Vice President is second in command.

A quick search also showed that “vice” can mean a substitute for another but is not a common usage.  But you never know….

Most people are familiar with vice in regards to criminals.  For example, the show “Miami Vice” and most police departments have a narcotics and vice division.  Vice is what society deems illegal.

But everyone has their vices, whether it is chocolate or gambling.

Without some kind of vice, we are not human.  Something to ponder.

Awe

What is awe?

Awe is the first lightning bugs/ fireflies of the summer, the first rose, the first bloom, watching something injured recovered.

Awe is birth and death.

Awe is the full moon and being in a new place for the first time.  Awe is seeing others’ talents spread out before you.

Awe is the stars, the sky, the sun and how much we rely on this world to exist.

Awe is learning something that changes your life and your perspective.

Awe is sitting outside at night, listening to the insects chirp, and the little animals scamper by you in the dark.

Awe is being alive.

Awe is awe.

 

In, On, At

One of the most challenging parts of the English language to learn are the prepositions. Native speakers tend not to think about these or analyze them a lot.  Yet for people learning English, especially in the beginning stages, they can be confusing.

In: we use for specific locations.  Example: I am in my kitchen.

On: Objects, and people, “on” something: My keys are on the table. (Your keys can’t be in the table, but they can be in the drawer.)

At: general location: I am at the hospital.  Great, but where exactly?

My most common example I use with beginning learners:

I am at the hospital in the emergency room on the first floor.