Group Discussion, or not?

Again, from a prompt….the ideal conversation….

First, we all talk to ourselves.  It helps us figure things out, settle us.

Second, it depends on the situation.  I may personally prefer one-to-one in order to get to know someone.  Yet sometimes putting people in with a third, or fourth, or in a large group totally changes dynamics and may reveal a lot about someone.

Some people like to be in control of group situations and some people will only talk when with one or two other people.

Having been in many different types of classrooms over the years, I can instantly tell you who my talkers will be and who my silent ones will be.  Trying to get the silent ones to talk is a challenge I relish.  Yet, if the talkers aren’t around, the silent ones immediately open up and they always know so much more than they give themselves credit for.

This is why I like one-on-one and small groups when given the opportunity.

This is also why coffee shops are popular.  They give the opportunity for one-on-one and small group discussion.

What is your favorite type of conversation?

Missing the Blue Planet….

This is from a prompt….

I caught about twenty five minutes of a local radio segment today about Sir Isaac Newton. Remember him? One of the many people we learned about in school.  One of the many people whose pictures are of someone in a big, white wig.  Then the immortal story of how he discovered gravity when an apple hit him on the head.

Well, even in the twenty-five minutes, the person discussing him shared a lot more about him.

Newton didn’t have it easy and ended up having a God-complex.  Yet he invented calculus and self-studied and self-learned.

If I lived on Mars, I would miss little “aha” moments like this.

I would miss sitting in my car, the sun shining, birds flying past my windshield, the sky blue, trees whistling softly in the little wind, listening to someone share their knowledge about a person my education didn’t teach me about.

I would miss the seasons, the full moon and its’ awesome glow.

I would miss the radio programs.

Heck, I would miss gravity and then would have to relearn another type of gravity all together without an apple tree to help me.

I’ll stay.

In, On, At

One of the most challenging parts of the English language to learn are the prepositions. Native speakers tend not to think about these or analyze them a lot.  Yet for people learning English, especially in the beginning stages, they can be confusing.

In: we use for specific locations.  Example: I am in my kitchen.

On: Objects, and people, “on” something: My keys are on the table. (Your keys can’t be in the table, but they can be in the drawer.)

At: general location: I am at the hospital.  Great, but where exactly?

My most common example I use with beginning learners:

I am at the hospital in the emergency room on the first floor.

Beginning Tips: Part One

Hello!

Welcome to Your Mind in Bloom’s Beginning Tips.  You’ve asked for this.

We are going to begin today with one of our most asked for topics: resumes.

We all need resumes, known in some circles as CVs.

Before you even begin writing your resume, sit down in a quiet spot, no social media, with a notepad/ notebook and pen or pencil.

Use one sheet of paper for every work experience you have had in the last five years, both paid and volunteer.  (Yes! Volunteering does count!) (And yes! Homemaker/ stay-at-home counts! More on that later….)

Write down everything, and I mean EVERYTHING, you did.  No matter how small, no matter how insignificant.

Some questions to ponder:

  1. What did you do?
  2. What did you do on a daily basis?
  3. What daily routines did you have?
  4. Any major responsibilities?
  5. Any minor responsibilities?
  6. Any successes? Improvements? Positive changes?
  7. Who were your customers/ clients?
  8. How did you help your customers/ clients?
  9. What specific skills did you use?
  10. What specific skills did you learn?
  11. Write a quick summary, two to three sentences, of your typical day/ shift/ experience.

Need help? Questions? : Contact us: 1 (203) 414-5176 or email: yourmindinbloom@yahoo.com