The Power of Value & Dead Scooters

I was doing a Word of the Day for a while.  I found one of the notepads recently where I jotted down my ideas about the word “value”.

Value:

Value goes beyond money.

Volunteer value.

Value vs. Worth

Worth = money?

How much do you value……?

What is the value of…….?

Love/ monetary/ friendship/ financial

I was thinking of this word after an EMS shift where my partner and myself moved a couple of hundred pound dead mobility scooter.  The person who called is a “regular” and she called for a “fall” but the “fall” was really a dead scooter.  The home health aide said they told the person not to call but the person did anyway.

We dragged that scooter across a tiny condo to the person’s bedroom using a canvas stretcher.  Then we took the person’s vitals.

The service I work with doesn’t bill for refusals.  We couldn’t help the scooter.  The scooter was blocking access to the tiny kitchen.

I guess in this case our value went beyond money.

girl eating lollipop
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Underappreciated Day

November 3 has been marked as “Housewife’s Day”.  It really should be called “Underappreciated Day” or something similar.

The site where I was reading about it, called “Days of the Year” (www.daysoftheyear.com) talks about how the origins are unknown.  What is this, a treat yourself day before the winter holidays break loose?

Again, again, and again there are statistics about the uncounted for hours and monetary value of house work.  Notice that the day is not “House Keeper’s Day”, that would mean something totally different.  Also, this excludes the men who stay home to care for their families as well as LGBT families.  Additionally, it leaves out the people who take care of ailing or sick family members.

House care and house work is a boring, tedious part of life.  Ask any child or adult who does chores.  Yes, some people thrive on chores and laundry yet most people cannot deal with the chaos that uncleaned houses brings.

As an EMT, walking in the front door of someone’s house immediately tells you what kind of person you are going to be dealing with.  I’ve seen plenty of houses where the person has given up and they don’t care.  There are also many, many people in less affluent areas where the houses are sparkling clean inside and you want to tip toe across their floors so as not to dirty them.

Also, my clients who are in transition come to me with the societal bias that their caregiving work means nothing towards their paid work and/ or professional skills, especially on a resume.  I spend a lot of time talking with them about what they have done and in most cases do.  People undervalue caregiving and daily maintenance work and what it takes to do this kind of work.  People are running households on budgets comparable with those of a small business.  People are leading civic groups and raising money for community projects that otherwise would not be funded.  People are running small little mom and pop enterprises.  All of this at the same time as being labeled a “housewife”.

So, the next time someone asks you “What do you do all day?” the answer should be “Let me show you my list”.

Review: The Bronze Bow by Speare

I’m surprised this book isn’t more well known.

Rating for making your mind bloom: 10 out of 10.

Similar to Ms. Speare’s well known book The Witch of Blackbird Pond, The Bronze Bow also steps back into a historical time period through a first-person narration.

Daniel bar Jamin is eighteen years old and lives in Galilee in about the year, as we know today, 30 A.D or 30 C.E.  Daniel is an outcast having run away from an indentured servitude/ slavery after losing most of his family due to the Romans.  Daniel wants to fight the Romans but also crosses paths with a carpenter named Jesus.  Daniel finds himself in some very tricky situations that are not always what they seem and makes some tough choices along the way.

There are some parallels between Daniel and Kit, the narrator of Witch.  Both are coming of age in a society where they find they do not belong yet are forced to fit in in order to survive.  Both must put their families into their lives even though they didn’t want to. Both embrace people who are shunned by the general society.  Both must make difficult choices.  Religion also plays a major part in both of their lives and stories.

Both of the books received a Newberry Medal.  If you read Witch, The Bronze Bow is a must.

 

Daily Prompt: Snack

via Daily Prompt: Snack

Snacks are good.  Snacks are bad.  What makes a snack good or bad?  When it takes the place of a meal?  When it becomes a meal?  When you use snack food to count as a meal?

I hate all of the snack food packaging more than I hate the idea of a snack.  The British have it right with a 4 p.m. tea time.  How did earlier societies and cultures do without snack food and this idea of a snack?  Was the concept always there but in different forms?  Maybe I’ve read too many books and stories about war time, yet no one makes mention of snacks and snacking.

Some people say small meals are the way to go, others say no.  Even doctors and nutritionists can’t seem to make up their minds about meal vs. snack.

An apple to take the edge off of hunger is my view of a snack.  A bag of chips is not.  Yet chips are always cheaper than a single apple in some stores.

“I’ll have a snack” seems to be a very deadly thought and statement in the English language.  Cutting out the sugar, the ice cream, and the late eating helps curb the want for snacks in my experience.  When I say sugar, I mean the processed, the natural sugars in fruit and vegetables that our bodies are made to absorb.  Exercising helps as well.

And sometimes snacks seem to make you more hungry.

I still vote for tea time.

Daily Prompt: Cringe

via Daily Prompt: Cringe

I spent over three hours and ended up with three large bags full of poison ivy.  Poison ivy makes me cringe.

Cringe is a normal reaction.  We can cringe at a lot of things and everyone is different at what they cringe at.  Some things we are afraid of others are not.  No one person is the same.

Also, how we cringe is different.  Some people are very physical and some people it can only be a twitch.  Others don’t show any physical sign.

What makes you cringe?  How do you cringe?  What do you notice when people around you cringe?

Daily Prompt: Meddle

via Daily Prompt: Meddle

Don’t meddle in other people’s affairs.  Don’t meddle in something that isn’t your business.  Don’t be a meddler.  Don’t meddle in politics.

How many times have we heard this?  Who came up with these words of advice anyway? How many people still do this kind of stuff?

This word always makes me think of busybody old ladies sitting around gossiping with the blue wigs and drinking tea.

Some people mistake this word with “metal” because of the pronunciation.

Can one meddle in a good way?  Is community advocacy a good way of meddling?  How else can one meddle in a positive way?